Plastic Jesus Cross And Crucifix Model " JP1 " Size 13×15cm Funeral Decoration
2000 pcs
MOQ
$0.4/pcs
Price
Plastic Jesus Cross And Crucifix Model " JP1 " Size 13×15cm Funeral Decoration
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Features
Basic Infomation
Place of Origin: China
Brand Name: B&R
Certification: ISO
Model Number: JP1
High Light:

cross crucifix

,

catholic cross

Payment & Shipping Terms
Packaging Details: carton
Delivery Time: 30 days
Payment Terms: L/C, D/A, T/T, Western Union
Supply Ability: 500000pcs/Month
Specifications
Material: Plastic
Size: 13*15cm
Color: Antique Bronze
Product Description

Main information:

Product name: Funeral accessory

Model: JP1

Brand: B&R

Application: Funeral decoration

Origin: China

Manufacturer: Sumer International (Beijing) Trading Co.,Ltd

 

Product detail:

Size: 13*15 cm

Material: Plastic (PP or ABS)

Color: Gold, Silver or Bronze (Optional)

Curved backside for tightly attached on urn

MOQ:2000 pcs

 

Main feature:

Professionally engaged in funeral field over 10 years;

Customized products acceptable;

Good quality and competitive price;

 

More information:

 

About ABS

Identifiers
CAS Number 9003-56-9
ChemSpider · none
ECHA InfoCard 100.127.708
Properties
Chemical formula (C8H8·C4H6·C3H3N)n
Density 1.060–1.080 g·cm−3
Solubility in water Insoluble in water
Related compounds


The crucifix is a principal symbol for many groups of Christians, and one of the most common forms of the Crucifixion in the arts. It is especially important in the Latin Rite of the Roman Catholic Church, but is also used in the Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox, Assyrian, and Eastern Catholic Churches, as well as by many Lutheran and Anglican churches. The symbol is less common in churches of other Protestant denominations, which prefer to use a cross without the figure of Jesus (the corpus). The crucifix emphasizes Jesus' sacrifice — his death by crucifixion, which Christians believe brought about the redemption of mankind. Most crucifixes portray Jesus on a Latin cross, rather than any other shape, such as a Tau cross or a Coptic cross.
A crucifix (from Latin cruci fixus meaning "(one) fixed to a cross") is an image of Jesus on the cross, as distinct from a bare cross. The representation of Jesus himself on the cross is referred to in English as the corpus (Latin for "body").

 

Western crucifixes usually have a three-dimensional corpus, but in Eastern Orthodoxy Jesus' body is normally painted on the cross, or in low relief. Strictly speaking, to be a crucifix, the cross must be three-dimensional, but this distinction is not always observed. An entire painting of the Crucifixion of Jesus including a landscape background and other figures is not a crucifix either.

 

Large crucifixes high across the central axis of a church are known by the Old English term rood. By the late Middle Ages these were a near-universal feature of Western churches, but are now very rare. Modern Roman Catholic churches often have a crucifix above the altar on the wall; for the celebration of Mass, the Roman Rite of the Catholic Church requires that, "on or close to the altar there is to be a cross with a figure of Christ crucified".

 

Usage
Prayer in front of a crucifix, which is seen as a sacramental, is often part of devotion for Christians, especially those worshipping in a church, and also privately. The person may sit, stand, or kneel in front of the crucifix, sometimes looking at it in contemplation, or merely in front of it with head bowed or eyes closed. During the Middle Ages small crucifixes, generally hung on a wall, became normal in the personal cells or living quarters first of monks, then all clergy, followed by the homes of the laity, spreading down from the top of society as these became cheap enough for the average person to afford. By the 19th century displaying a crucifix somewhere in the general reception areas of a house became typical of Catholic homes.

 

Roman Catholic (both Eastern and Western), Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox, Anglican and Lutheran Christians generally use the crucifix in public religious services. They believe use of the crucifix is in keeping with the statement by Saint Paul in Scripture, "we preach Christ crucified, a stumbling block to Jews and folly to Gentiles, but to those who are called, both Jews and Greeks, Christ the power of God and the wisdom of God".

In the West altar crosses and processional crosses began to be crucifixes in the 11th century, which became general around the 14th century, as they became cheaper. The Roman Rite requires that "either on the altar or near it, there is to be a cross, with the figure of Christ crucified upon it, a cross clearly visible to the assembled people. It is desirable that such a cross should remain near the altar even outside of liturgical celebrations, so as to call to mind for the faithful the saving Passion of the Lord."The requirement of the altar cross was also mentioned in pre-1970 editions of the Roman Missal,[12] though not in the original 1570 Roman Missal of Pope Pius V.The Rite of Funerals says that the Gospel Book, the Bible, or a cross (which will generally be in crucifix form) may be placed on the coffin for a Requiem Mass, but a second standing cross is not to be placed near the coffin if the altar cross can be easily see from the body of the church.

 

Eastern Christian liturgical processions called crucessions[citation needed] include a cross or crucifix at their head. In the Eastern Orthodox Church, the crucifix is often placed above the iconostasis in the church. In the Russian Orthodox Church a large crucifix ("Golgotha") is placed behind the Holy Table (altar). During Matins of Good Friday, a large crucifix is taken in procession to the centre of the church, where it is venerated by the faithful. Sometimes the soma (corpus) is removable and is taken off the crucifix at Vespers that evening during the Gospel lesson describing the Descent from the Cross. The empty cross may then remain in the centre of the church until the Paschal vigil (local practices vary). The blessing cross which the priest uses to bless the faithful at the dismissal will often have the crucifix on one side and an icon of the Resurrection of Jesus on the other, the side with the Resurrection being used on Sundays and during Paschaltide, and the crucifix on other days.

Exorcist Gabriele Amorth has stated that the crucifix is one of the most effective means of averting or opposing demons. In folklore, it is believed to ward off vampires, incubi, succubi, and other evils.

 

Modern iconoclasts have used an inverted (upside-down) crucifix when showing disdain for Jesus Christ or the Catholic Church which believes in his divinity.[15] According to Christian tradition, Saint Peter was martyred by being crucified upside-down.

 

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